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into the environment. they have started work on a project to stop the contaminated water from escaping into the environment. workers for tokyo electric power company discovered three of seven underground storage pools are leaking. tepco officials believe pools one and two may be leak being the most. so they're placing priority on training them. on tuesday workers started transferring with 20 tons per hour from pool two to an above ground tank more than 400 meters away. officials say the process will be long. they plan to step up monitoring to make sure no water escapes during transfer. they estimate they'll be able to move more than 23,000 tons of contaminated water by early june. but the underground pools will continue to leak during the operation. crews will pump any contaminated water they collect back no the fool minimize damage to the environment. tepco officials say the volume of contaminated water is increasing by about 400 tons per day. they'll no longer use the underground storage pools and plan to install more above ground tanks. they're working on finding a way to decontamin
the chief of production goals from unconventional shell plays, i think the environment going forward has never looked brighter for u.s. infrastructure. >> i think et was yesterday someone said nat gas is the new safe haven, suddenly this is start to go look a little more price afforded. any view on that? >> i think that dmodty prices, a broader view, i think that peak energy, we believe in just the opposite at yorkville. we think energy prices will probably be the growth driver of the global economy. it has a lot of implications. it's very good for the u.s. and our consumers. it's very good for china. >> you say peak energy in terms of we're going to see declines -- >> i think we're going to see stability. the new energy supplies coming online are more expensive to extract from the ground, so you're not going to get back to $20 a barrel oil in our lifetime. but this $80 to $11 is 00, peaking at $120 dropping to $60 is probably a new range in the u.s. i see natural gas, it's at 350 right now, roughly, $4 to $6 range, $16 in japan, mid teen prices in germany. that's giving us a competitive
the policy environment the so conducive to dealing with the key issues between the u.s. and mexico. the immigration bill is hot and heavy, front and center. marco rubio did ginsburg in espagnole. he had five sunday shows, to talk about immigration. the gang of eight is hard at work on that. guns, u.s.-mexico relations. outink the guns may come not quite as favorable to mexico's longstanding positions as the immigration debate might. i would take a 14 two. we will be in good shape. the third is trade. mexico, the united states, now japan, canada, are linked in the trans-pacific partnership talks. talks with many of our key trading allies across the pacific. many of us view it as a chance to help bring nafta into the 21st century. the three are very much on the u.s. agenda. it shows great forward progress. welcome all of you to what promises to be a truly fascinating session. be second reason this will terrific is because of our panelists. i will say little bit more about the ambassador of mexico. doris meissner, who i served with in the clinton administration. she is one of our grea
are in a no growth environment. they are getting in the way of growth. the news in europe is extremely bad and going to get worse. their economy looks just absolutely horrible. stuart: they give very much, indeed. a very clean cut opinion. we appreciate that. thank you very much. the opening bell coming up 20 seconds from now. maybe a gain of ten-15 points. please remember we were down 138 points yesterday. 352,000 new claims for unemployment insurance. that was last week. that is a relative high number. nothing like what you expected. firing trend, the layoff trend still very much with us. we opened 11 points higher. now, we are up 23. let's get right to it. apple. where did it open today? nicole petallides. nicole: at least they have an up arrow today. we have to keep a close eye on apple. people who own apple not only is they are hot on technology, but if they are on the s&p 500. stuart: down 25% so far this year. down about 50% from september, october of last year. we get the earnings next week. a big buildup for that. tuesday of next week, i believe. the opening quote for apple had a fault righ
different country, we are living in a very different environment where it is no longer patriotism and love and family, it is not terrorists and hate. we have toounderstand that. we have to say we are in fact committed to our liberties and freedom, but you know, the people also deserve to be safe in their neighborhoods and homes. melissa: you think we have to figure out what to do from here, how to live differently, what should have been the indifferently for something like this not happen? >> we have many students in boston. they get here on a student visa from countries all across the world and we are happy about that but once they get here they don't return. many of them don't return and they stay here for 6 years, they marry and become permanent citizens and we don't know if these two young men from chechnya, i know what that places like. i have seen violence in belfast and all these places where i have been, as a diplomat and an ambassador. the other thing is i always -- at the marathon and walking up the street and saw hundreds and hundreds of young people walking around with backpack
... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] we didn't have u-verse back in my day. you couldn't just... guys... there you are. you know you couldn't just pause a show in one room, then... where was i... you couldn't pause a show in one room then start playing it in another. and...i'm talking to myself... [ male announcer ] call to get u-verse tv for just $19 a month for 2 years with qualifying bundles. rethink possible. oakland police announcing your rest of the murder, five suspects between 14 and 16 years ago have been taking into custody. we have video coming up of the scene boyer was shot and then drove his car down the hill. the suspects are so young is troubling. >> i am deeply deeply concerned by this by the fact that the person responsible for this man's murder ages range between 15 to 16 years old, unacceptable! we notice that the h for the suspect involved in many murders or robberies' are now between 14 and 17 years old. >> catherine >> catherine:president obama heads to boston thursday - for a the fbi is asking people to come for what many feel or anything t
of exchanges going on right now. forward to a post 2013 environment, to you believe these multibillion-dollar payments will continue regardless of their being an american presence or nato troop presence in afghanistan? maintaineve we need to a constructive and effective relationship with pakistan. we need to recognize the real threat that pakistan has inside of its own borders. from my perspective we have to do whatever it takes to ensure that our national vital interests is protected. >> one of the things i am always looking into that aid is whether or not it does serve the military. you are saying we need to do whatever it takes to continue that relationship. are you saying that payments of that size and nature are going to be what is required in the long run? >> i believe it is in our best interest to continue to develop the pakistani army in ensuring that they can effectively deal issues in their borders. i cannot tell you that every program we have in place is one we ought to assisting in the future. that is not something i paying particular attention to in my current duties. i am
-- scare people, but what you should do in this environment is don't get distracted from there, don't go for fear. >> ross, if what you're saying suggests, perhaps, gold still is a safe haven, why do you think so? >> let me qualify that. it's an imperfect safe haven. it's an imperfect safe haven, particularly in the short run. >> against what? >> against financial meltdown or inflation or politicians not doing what they should do, in that case. so it's an insurance plan, if you like. >> is the reason we have this down move is because people are now -- is the gold pricing in the fact we're not going to get more qe out of -- >> it may be. and it's part of the story dwr the shorts have hit gold is not because of what has happened, but because of what hasn't happened. we haven't had hyper inflation. we didn't have the euro collapse. certain things didn't happen. i think that would have aggravated the gold market. fundamentally, it still remains in the short-term a long haven and imperfect. >> if nvs the kind of move, you know, that indicated that if gold were going to respond to more quantit
and it's particularly challenging in this fiscal environment. the administration's $39 billion budget deficit request makes some very tough choices. it cuts the department's budget by roughly 2%, below 2012 levels. but it's the least consistent with what the congress appropriated in 2013 for the epartment. stepping back and thinking of all the challenges that our country and this department have faced since 2009, christmas day bomber, time square bomber, yemen cargo bomb plot, hurricane sandy and the ever-changing and ever-growing cyberthreat, and now the boston attack, it's easy to become concerned with this budget request. that said, we're facing extremely difficult budgetary times and sacrifices must be made. and while i recognize important missions may not receive all of the funds they or we would want in a perfect world, all departments and agencies in government must share in the sacrifice to some extent required to iranian in our deficit -- rein in our deficit. our secretary seems to have taken this message to heart. identifying some $1.3 billion in cost savings this year and m
. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] (male announcer) live from the bay area here is your kron 4 news >> tub stories we're following in the kron4 morning news is suspicious package as one found near the lotta's fountain ready for a celebration. >> a big rig collision earlier this morning cause and a major back up for it the commute, but george has an update on the hot spot of 580. >> thousands of commuters are expecaffected by this problem. it is not completely clear from the traffic lanes but the resulting back up has reached all the way to the 2 05 interchange. that is still jammed. drive times as the clock that over 2 hours. it is not going to clear up any time soon. even with all the lanes open this will take a long time to clear. when the traffic is backed up like this, it has an accordion affect. it will start to move and then back again in the westbound direction. it just takes a long long time to clear. sadly, this is not our only hot spot. major delays of the bayshore freeway and then out a stamp francisco between s f o and downtown san f
advertisers into an environment with twitter to really understand the social tv space. melissa: what does that mean in english for people that do not understand advertising? >> went to third audience are sitting next to their smart phone and tablet and watching tv. there are conversations happening. their customers include coca-cola, procter and gamble, all of the big names that are out there. they will be able to go on twitter and mine what consumers are talking about. what shows they are watching. it seems like you can collect data. it is endless. >> absolutely. how do we mind these opportunities whether it is direct to understand the conversation. we can make sure that our brands are more fully embedded and engaging. melissa: i am an avid twitter user. it is easy, clean, straightforward. there is not a lot of clutter. what is an add on twitter going to look like and will it ruin the experience? >> i think it will look very different tomorrow than it does today. you want to create advertising that is even more relevant. you wanted to be more engaging. melissa: it is not the difference b
on environment quality are on site, they are monitoring and they are ensuring that the public is safe and that's all they would say. >> is this a plant that's had safety problems or regulatory problems in the past? >> we do know from comments made by the suspect of education that a couple of months ago in february possibly the plant did a controlled burn of some lumber and trees that were on site and they did a controlled burn and they asked that the intermediate ya school nearby be evacuated while they do that controlled burn but other than that that's the only thing or concern issued one gentleman cannot return to his home, the blast burned his windows and doors off, he t me he's had concerns about possible chemical contamination but he never thought there elos said he never really pursued those concerns but he did have them uaz: ammonium nrate is a commonly used fertilizer. is this an agricultural area of texas? is west a logical place to have a plant of this kind? >> yes, indeed, it is. and the plant has services all of the farmers and ranchers in this central texas area around west and on
. the environment is not agreed to. >> a few minutes ago, the minority in the united states senate decided it was not worth it. they blocked common sense gun reforms even while the families looked on from the senate gallery. >> a big loss for president obama and big loss from the fam faps from newtown who traveled to washington to lobby lawmakers and they lost on the big amendment that was agreed to by democrat manchin and republican toomey. republicans that voted yes, toomey and kirk and collins from maine and mccain from arizona. democrats who voted no. hicamp from north dakota. prior from arkansas . begas from alaska and baucus and reid. >> at the white house it was technically more bipartisan. even hoe harry reid did vote the way he did. i was struck by the want president's comments just before we went on air when he let loose on with a tirade. now, i don't think it was likely anyway. but the president is not -- and that is the way he attacks today . if you read the president's comments simply on the attack of the fellow red state demdements. it is a searing indictment of them and the
wildlife. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] i loi ve these shoes. but buwhen they start hurting, i haveha to take them off. until tii found dr. scholl's for her. they sup sport and cushion my feet all day.y. this is ihappiness - happy feet. so, i', ve got energy and style all day. dr. sc. holl's for her . for foheels and flats. i'm i'a believe. welcome back the time is 6:56 a.m.. we're working on a hot spot that is still o box 30 to 40 minutes away from clearing. this has backed up 580 westbound for miles. we're looking at an hour or an 45 minute drive time. if this is from alta mount pass way to the 680 interchange. avoid this area and we will be right back with more of our live coverage. >> there is an interface service going on for the prayers of the victims of the marathon bombings. will be right back.
that only becomes more true in these environments. think about, this isn't islamabad coming online. think about what that does for education, for health. think about 5 billion new witnesses that can document atrocities that are being committed. of course there are challenges but there is a lot of good news ahead of us. >> everybody's empowered. you do a google search when you go to a doctor and instead of sitting there where the doctor is playing god -- >> has all the info -- >> you have as much info as you want going in there and a lot of doctors hate that. you can say wait a second, isn't there a possibility if you do that, this is -- we are empowered in every way from powered by a car and how we're taken care of and also democratically. i had had a political science professor who told me back in the '80s the soviets were mar for worried about a xerox machine than a cruise missile in west germany and she was right. >> the empowerment of information of people is really the way to solve almost every problem. when we went to north korea our idea was that if we could just get a little bit o
a temporary file restriction over a section of the boston area to provide a safer environment for law enforcement activities. logan airport remains open under heightened security. most flights departing and arriving on schedule. greyhound bus service has been suspended. dagen: thank you so much. it is not just boston. this will be felt in the northeast. thank you so much. connell: a briefing any moment from local authorities. you will see it live. you will keep you up-to-date as we have been on what is happening in the markets throughout the day. mike baker joins us on the telephone right now. former cia covert operations officer and president these days of his own intelligence firm that he is a part of. one suspected terrorists has been killed. another is still at large just outside of the big american city. what stands out to you? >> well, i mean, so much for disgruntled tax filers irresponsible for your will attack. you know, this opens a single to all sorts of investigations. right now obviously there is a major effort not just ride on the ground in the immediate boston regional a
there is almost a divorce on how earnings and economies grow. connell: how does that environment sustain itself? >> is it sustainable in the long run, no. that means over a ten year cycle. i am focused over the next year or two years. earnings can continue to grow because we see 20% of s&p 500 companies hoarding. only 45% have beat revenues. i think that we could be in a period of time where we have a divergence in the markets between those that are doing really well and those that are not doing really well at all. you could get a lot of disparities. connell: brian jacobson, wells fargo, thank you very much. appreciate it. >> thank you. dagen: rilling knowing about it through minor. connell: at&t versus google. we will tell you why. we will keep an eye on the market. a big day today. oil is down. we will be back with much more on market now. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] help brazil reduce its ovell reliance on foreign imports with the launch of the country's largest petrochemical operation. ♪ when emerson takes up the challenge, "it's never been done before" simply bemes consider it solved.
money printing. in those environments, gold does very well. you have the goldman sachs downgrade. you have people picking sides. then you have the slowing chinese debt. i think that really hits the market all at once. that led to margins being that and they continue to tumble downwards. dagen: talk about the difference you are seeing in behavior. are you seeing any selling among those physical gold owners? >> not as dramatic of a difference. we are a precious metals platform. on friday and monday, we had four to five times as many body and sell orders. we have done our own research. i think that plays into my point. it is somewhat reminiscent to what happened to apple. in the paper market, you have a dramatic selloff. in the physical market, the demand is very, very strong. connell: let's follow up on that. let's talk about apple. the big game for the dollar versus the euro. is that part of the case you make for gold? >> i think part of the reason is for safety. in times like this, i think now is a fantastic entry point. it is certainly better than two weeks ago. it is uncorrelated. t
slices so everybody can eat. you need to get more pizza. in order to do that you need an environment good for business. and i think they have all lost sight of that. it's not about taxes, redistribution. >> are you looking for a quick fix? >> there's no quick fix to this. there's a very difficult fix to this and things if both sides will have to do that are uncomfortable in the short run. lying about it isn't going to make it better. by saying social security, medicare, medicaid aren't in trouble, is not going to make it better. >> working so well. >> despicable. >> bob, thank you for coming in today. >> thank you. >> j.j., rick, see you soon. thank you. >> always a pleasure. >> our guest host will be with us the rest of the show. >> very excited this morning. >> tell us what you really think. coming up, more on goldman sack's earnings report. beating the streets expectations by 40%. up next, reaction from financial sector analysts. the one and only dick bove. ♪ ♪ the new blackberry z10 with time shift and blackberry balance. built to keep you moving. see it in action at blackberry.co
. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations' with kroll and humane degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. law and international treaty obligations this conclusion is and based upon our own personal impressions, but rather grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes the torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees and many instances met the standards. the courts have determined constituting torture. but you look at the united states state department and its annual country reports
whether these were small bits of metal placed there intentionally or part of the environment. >> reporter: shrapnel is just one of the clues investigators will be looking at. >> there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments within the victims. fragments in the sidewalk. what they're going to be able to do is probably reconstruct the timer device, what was used, they're going to look at the components of the bomb, able to tell them is this just somebody that put this together over the internet or is this a bomb maker? >> reporter: hundreds of state and federal investigators have descended on boston to try to find out who could have built the bombs and set them off. >> there are federal, state and local law enforcement all on scene and coordinating very close ly. the fbi has taken charge of the investigation. >> reporter: this type of attack has long been law enforcement's worst fear, a soft target where suspects can easily blend in and inflict mass casualties. the boston marathon is a heavily policed event. more than 500 national guard troops were on s
may also be a constraining factor. living in a bad home environment can be a big distraction. budget cuts is probably the worst problem of all. >> scheduled cuts that would take place unless congress acts would mean 8.2% cuts. >> cut. >> yes, cut. and these aren't just dollar signs in percent. they are children's futures. >> programs are designed to pick up the slack for kids whose needs aren't being met. all of those programs are designed to deliver needs of children not being met by the larger system. to cut seven point eight percent would have an incredible impact on students across america. >> before we fix the educational system, we need to find out what meets [indiscernible] >> we do have room for improvement. one of the areas that we are weak in is allowing students the opportunity to be creative in their learning and for us to decided relevance for students. with the advent of technologies, students don't teachers foreed information. they can go to the internet and get answers. but what they do need teachers for his what information is relevant? what information is accurate?
of that traffic. .t causes obviously delays it has an adverse impact on the environment as well. is to expand the american plaza, but also pursue span.bridges fan -- new yorket in buffalo, we southern ontario are -- need capacity. w want emphasize that we are trying to remove barriers to access, both physical and in tolls. when you look at the situation with the peace bridge, a lot of tolls are being used to support expansion of the plaza to promote traffic between the united states and canada. this is something that would be of concern. my sense is that it would be a new agency imposed toll compared to the ones that are already in place. help iniate all of your helping us address the issues and the peace bridge connecting buffalo and southern ontario in particular. i yield that. >> thank you. i turned to the gentleman from utah. thank youecretary, for your services. this is probably a long hearing. you do not know the line of questioning, so it requires you to be an expert on everything. things i would like to ask you quickly if i could. >> sure. >> as a former air force pilot, uncomfortabl
-term, but in this environment, where sentiment, we've got unusually bearish quickly. we've got more weakness in store. >> so you would wait. this isn't necessarily an entry point for you, yet? >> no, if i had cash on the sidelines, pretty much at the close of today, the average stock in the s&p 500 was off about 7% from its 52-week high. the average technology stock, 11% from its 52-week high, if we get another 3% to 5% down in stocks, then i think that cash on the sidelines should be absolutely put to work, because the next two or three years still bodes quite well for the stock market relative to most other asset classes. >> i may have to break in momentarily when those american express earnings come out. but first, jerry webben, let me ask you, the fear has been this week with news out of china, some of the economic data that we've gotten here, that maybe the global growth rate is slowing down. do you sense that at all? >> i think, yes, both in the u.s. and in china, we've seen some slowness in the emerging markets and europe remains extremely weak, but you've got to look at those growth areas in the u.s. wi
environment and have been a part since iceland was -- [inaudible] >> taking step back and looking for a broadly two things i've been talking about climate change and fishing. has global environmental change been benefit to iceland's fishery or a detriment? >> well, it's very difficult to an that question, indeed it's one of the big issues -- a number of decades because it has tradition nayly been the key part of the export driven fishing circle. of course the species as well. some people are arguing cue to the -- [inaudible] so one of the reasons why there is a need for more active arctic corporation is in fact to study what is happen together fishery in the ocean of the world including the arctic and the ice melt. and i found it interesting when i invited them to iceland a few years ago, he is, as you might know, a special envoy of the president of france on arctic and polar issues. his argument was that the first dispute that would unearth nationings to a new situation in the arctic would be dispute over fisheries. that the meting of the arctic sea ice and the transmore fashion
in the first quarter. there is not much opportunity in a low yield environment. we're looking low single-digit type returns. maybe mid single at best. i think emd is is one of those opportunities. central banks paused in the first quarter in most markets in emerging market countries. i think the bump in yield we saw in the first quarter is an opportunity. we still think longer term those economies grow faster than developed countries. much less debt relative to the size of the economy. lori: i have to sop you there. we have breaking news. >> that opens up potential easing in the coming months. lori: it is an important part of every once investment portfolio. anthony, thanks. we'll check in with you. >> thank you. melissa: we have more breaking news about those reports that investigators believe they have identified a boston bomb suspect. rich edson is live at the white house with more on this rich, what have you heard? >> here are the details. fox news confirming authorities investigating the boston marathon bodies have an image of a young man carrying and perhaps dropping a bag at the s
easy. it is challenging in this fiscal environment. administrations 39 budget -- $39 million budget request. consistent with what congress appropriated in 2013 for the department before sequestration cuts were applied. the level of funding in this budget is lower than what congress appropriated in 2009. stepping back and thinking of the challenges that our country and this department has faced since 2009, times square bombing, hurricane sandy, the ever-changing and growing cyber threat, and of the boston attack, it is easy to become concerned with this budget request. we are facing extremely difficult budgetary times. sacrifices must be made. they may not receive all of the funding. and agencies in government must share in the sacrifice to some extent required during this deficit. our secretary seems to have taken this message to heart. he is identified $1.3 billion in savings this year and more than $4 billion since 2009. he continues to move from a risk-based approach and it effort to save more money. i'm happy to see this budget proposes a much-needed increase for cybersecurity,
political environments. another approach, one that we favor, is to lay out a better and clearer conservative vision of american society. the role of government, unlimited opportunity, of political self-government. rather than new principles, what we need are better arguments. and when you take those arguments -- we need to take those arguments to the american people. it is in that spirit that we welcome today's speaker to heritageouat mike lee is in th third year of his first term. that means more terms to follow. the first -- the third year of his first term as united states senator from the state of utah. his background is in the law and, actually, he began his background in law at his family's kitchen table. his father, rex lee, was a law school dean, assistant u.s. attorney general and solicitor general for ronald reagan. senator lee is a graduate of brigham young university and byu law school, was a law clerk for judge dean benson of the u.s. district court of the district of utah and then judge sam alito's clerk when he was at the u.s. court of appeals for the 3rd circuit. he served as
to better growth in the second half of the year. >> demand environment played out as we expected and i think the company executed well. as i just heard john say, we saw nice growth in our data center business. it was up 7% year on year. and within the overall market for computing, we're seeing nice growth and there's obviously a transition going on there. i think we're well positioned for that as well. >> intel shares closed up less than 1% and moving around after hours. also up a little less than 1% in frankfurt this morning which is no small feat considering germany's market is down by better than 1% as we speak. yahoo! first quarter rose and beat forecasts but revenue was flat and shy of estimates as the company feels the impact of declining web traffic and display ad sales fell for the second straight quarter down 11%. yahoo! is also projecting second quarter revenues that fell short of analysts expectations. ceo marissa mayer says her plans to reverse the trend is still on track and will show results in the second half of the year. she cautions it will be years before yahoo! grows at th
that poison our water... and harm wildlife. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] ♪ i -- i got it ♪ i got it made, i got it made ♪ i got it made ♪ i got breakfast made fresh at subway® ♪ ♪ breakfast made the way i say [ male announcer ] at subway®, you got breakfast made. like a sunrise subway melt™ with chipotle southwest sauce. ♪ at subway® ♪ >> keeping our eyes on wall street in the kron 4 morning a down day today. the opening bell at 630. what a day yesterday about 158. . the dow fell to under 65 on monday. we're starting to see larger swings in the market. a strong report on housing. good quarterly earnings for major companies help the stock market rebound. the dow jones of wanted to dig for its close at 14,007 and 56. the nasdaq rose 48. closing at 3000 to about 64. ya hoo try to turn around with marissa mayer at the helm. the overall revenue for the quarter was lower than expected. we're seeing yahoo shares around 2% lower in pre-market trading. we could see a big drop but the start up early trading. will bring t
's pat tillman run. >> extremely challenging, not a secure environment. we can't put fences around, can't put an officer every two feet. we rely on every set of officers. >> so many radicalized groups, so many individuals out there, so many large events and soft targets, regardless of the event, the best security is knowing of the threat before the events occur. that means intelligence and lots of cameras, electronic surv surveillance and more law enforcement. >> for the most part, the public has said we'll accept that, it's the world we live in. >> reporter: identifying who carried out the bombing will help security officers everywhere, but no way will it change the threat to large public events. russian officials have also said in sochi for the winter olympics, they are watching what happens. and it's music festival season. it's the coachella vest festival and 4th of july events are very open events as well. all authorities looking at boston. hoping once they figure out what happened in boston it will help them go forward and make their venues more secure as well. don. >> all right. m
but not faulty aggression. he has to be able to work in different environments and have the drive. >> they look like german shepherds but they're not, correct? >> correct. this is a belgian. they're very similar. dutch shepherd german shepherd and this one. >> i remember the raids carried out on osama bin laden's compound that we learned about a mall inroy. his name was cairo, is that correct? >> that's correct. >> that's the first time i got the sense that wow, these are dogs with elite units. >> absolutely it's something that has. been -- >> what do they do? why is it so critical to have a dog? >> the primary thing for them is bomb detection. to have the ability for a dog to be able to move out in front is priceless. >> and i kept -- when did this start happening? did somebody say let's bring a dog and somebody said that's not a good idea or did somebody say, that is a good idea? >> dogs have been used since man existed but special operations started using them in vietnam and then after that the programs were largely disbanded and after 9/11 it was decided s
this is not an environment in which to address this. there are serious allegations of what they knew and did not know, and we'll have the benefit of hindsight. we are all monday morning quarterbacks on this, but because of his and issue intricately woven into legislation, we ought to let the dust settle, the emotions calm down before we address it. ashley: when you look at the root they took, everything was done legally. they went through the process, the younger brother became a citizen on 9/11 last year, the older brother held a green card, they filled out all the forms. what did the fbi now reportedly, allegedly i should say, knew they were tipped off the older brother, there was concerned about him. from an immigration point of view, some say they got through the cracks. tracy: fbi does not monitor immigrants. the fbi would only get involved with immigrant if there is credible allegation of criminal activity. it did not rise to the level of prosecution of credibility. they can only go forward with and do something with evidence when there is enough evidence to move forward with it did not exist at the ti
public venue 500,000 people, you can't create a fail safe environment. >> reporter: investigators have swept up a large amount of potential evidence including small bomb fragments and surveillance pictures and tape but we have to say it's too early to know if this attack was a work of a terror group, domestic or foreign, or the act of a lone wolf who was inspired to act out. charlie? >> bob orr, thanks. cities around the country increased security. with us now is rudy giuliani, mayor of new york city during the 9/11 attacks who consults with other cities on handling terror attacks and also john miller, nypd commissioner during mr. giuliani's tenure. this turns the clock back to 2001. whatever the thinking was on september 12th is now the thinking today. >> it really reminds us, right, of what we knew on september 11th and september 12th that the big news here is this is a horrible attack, terrible attack, my heart goes out to the people that were hurt but surprising there haven't been more of these since september 11th. we expected many attacks like this. the really remarkable story is
committee that it is an rook anymore-rich environment and mr. speaker, i'm an acronym challenged individual, so i'll be talking about the network and information technology research and development program. in the future i'll call it the program. it's the federal government's main research and development effort in unclassified networking, computing, software cybersecurity, and related information technology. research conducted under this program has led to scientific growth and innovation in several areas, including technologies in science, engineering, and medicine, computer-based education and training, and near real time weather forecasts which is really important in my state of wyoming. currently 15 federal agencies are contributing members to the program and even more participate. so h.r. 967, the bill in front of us, does two things. it updates the high performance computing act of 1991, and it re-authorizes the program to advance our nation's networking and information technology research and development. it's the digital age, mr. speaker. advances in networking and information tech
work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national zoo, he was so successful turning around a faltering institution that after he left they named a lion in his honor. john indeed was a lion, a lion on behalf of the federal employees, a lion on behalf of good government, a lion on behalf of integrity. john know he is a true leader and manager and an incredibly wa
, will probably be here working well past the year 2050 and probably, in today's environment, past the year 2060. our current retirement model is designed to give an employee a defined pension after a long career and it's a model that made a lot of sense in the 19 40's and 1950's but is not going to be appropriate for the 20 40's and the 20 50's. our world is becoming far so dynamic to make promises about pensions 40 and 50 years down the road. the benefit of a defined contribution system is that it gives employees options to consider. if job changes are possible, why hold people to benefits that they may not be able to use for 50 years? e're currently on a trajectory to hit about 400,000 career employees by the year 2017 and that's with all the changes we propose, the six to five day and the network changes as we shrink down. and after we reach that number, it's going to give us a pretty lean work force. we have a pretty lean work force right now from the standpoint of the network and the six-day delivery. but after that we will start hiring people. we estimate between 2017 and 2027, depending
and the reason is because the environment had so radically changed in a very short period of time. that's one of the things i detail. >> when we look at hawaii now we don't see that. we see the plantations and that sort of thing. so, t.d.? >> what i found out when i was researching this book is the paradise like other things is an intellectual and social construct and just as there is a paper trail in the spanish illusion that gold was to be found in florida, by the way i just want to clarify one thing it begins with the first massacre of white men in the western hemisphere certainly and north america and this is how our history began with a spanish learned there was nothing to be found. it was only tradition in florida, that was before they found out that they had established a settlement in jacksonville so they tore across the atlantic and massacred several hundred frenchmen and that is the beginning of the history. as i say in the beginning if we look at -- for this old guy looking for viagra and largely america thinks here comes a hurricane this is no understanding, but if you look at the
to go and -- to go into a morbid environment. he had enough to think about. so yes, she wrote letters. she didn't have many friends, unfortunately. but she did have this wonderful family who kept her going and there always seemed to be somebody there. as far as reading, i don't think she did very much which was a shame because she was a very intellectual woman, highly educated. that intellect and that wonderful education seemed wasted in some ways. >> next question comes from bonnie who is watching us in cincinnati. hi, bonnie, you're on the air. >> hi. thank you for taking my call. this is a most intriguing subject. i do collect albums from the 1840's and 1850's of the central united states. and i do own a journal that was written by a family member of william henry harrison. the harrison family coming from cincinnati. after his death, frequently the letters that do i have, i'm not a member of that family, however i do have several of the letters and albums hand written, journals, and frequently similar to mrs. pierce, in the older women, elders of the family, there is the serious co
. not clear if they're from the bomb itself or from -- from the environment around the bomb. the operations that we have performed are identical to the kind of work we would do in the army at a surgical team or combat support hospital. >> dr. king performed more than five surgeries on victims yesterday alone. >>> the thousands of runners still on the boston marathon's course when the bombs went off crossed something of a finish line yesterday in downtown boston. they were able to reclaim their belongings from marathon volunteers and given a medal for participating in the race. everyone had them. it had a unique story about this experience. >> of course, at first shock. you know not that i didn't believe my sister. nobody around me really seemed to know anything. nothing was out of the usual. runners kept going. but i decided to leave the route. and even running through the streets. >> her sister was across the street from where the bombs went off. she said the second blast rattled her teeth. she was hit by small pieces of shrapnel but unhurt. >> going back to those medals, really, that's wh
harsh, but is there a sense you put yourself in that environment enough that you are on borrowed time. the odds are such that you get hit anywhere, at any time. >> yeah. there vicious people and you care deeply about the world and they put their lives at risk. i got out. within the hour, i decided i had too many close calls. >> quickly. >> within an hour. you have to leave before you lose all your money. >> sebastian, which way is the frontline from here on hbo tomorrow at 8:00. thank you. we are going to make a move to breaking news on the boston medical center. dr. peter burke is talking to the press about the condition of the victims that are being treated there. . >> their lungs are not working and heart is not working and depending on what you bring to the table, that can be different. >> [inaudible]. >> not that i'm aware of. i'm sure it's available. the general process when you remove things from people we send them to the pathologist. that's the process. they will be available, i assume. we are talking about fragments taken out of the victims in this case. >> [inaudible]. . >>
environment. the ultimate goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share is much of the operatedhow the pumps and how they were made. we know that the one in front of us up until almost the last moment was working hard to try to keep the ship from sinking. unfortunately, when the water pushes out the oilers -- ump stoppede p moving. >> i think of the crew of the monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve the union and how ironic is that today, 151 years later, they are still serving the nation but in a very different way and in ways they could never imagine, for helping us understand marine conservation and about our past and helping us move forward and learn from the lessons of the past. to, looking at the history and literary life of virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on c-span3. >> "washington journal" continues. texaswe're back with republican louie gohmert, a member of the judiciary committee. thanks for being here. guest: n
to make sure it fosters an environment where we can have small, medium and large banks, where we can have community banks that thrive, regional banks that tlooip thrive and large global banks. incidentally, andrew, if you look at the largest 50 banks, only about a half dozen are u.s. banks and incidentally, of the top 20 or 25 banks, our largest is number ten. so in terms of the size of our banks vis-a-vis our overall economy, much smaller than our international fears. >> but what about the idea that it's not just the banks. it's the financial companies, the insurance companies -- >> in addition to banks, we do have insurance companies in the financial services forum. >> there have been a lot of questions raised about all the regulations that were dropped on the banks when some of these other companies, like aig, for example, they were a huge problem and they're not going to be regulated in quite the same way. there's talk about cracking down on the insurer, as well. >> in the case of the nonbank, the group that was created under dodd-frank, the fsoc, is looking to designate a number of t
is deeply troubling in an increasingly restrictive environment of civil liberties. this includes the measures with respect to registration as foreign agents and also restrictions on press and internet freedom. we made clear with human dialogue but we remain committed to open dialogue with civil seent supporting their efforts. >> i do a follow-up on that? >> sure. >> in the past -- i think the u.s. government has talked a lot about their concern of human rights abuse in chechnya. i'm wondering if you think the events in boston are going to change the way the government would see human rights in chechnya? >> with respect to the ongoing investigation in boston, i have to reiterate the secretary's comment that it would be highly norptse to make comments at this time. i can tell you this has been part of our human rights reporting on russia since 1995. you will find quite a bit of information on this year's report and they note serious human rights abuses taking place and human rights violations committed by authorities and militants. >> this is going to be the last question. >> you m
chemicals that poison our water... and harm wildlife. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] >>> row, row, row your boat. a live look there at crew. wow, they are really going this morning. yeah, it's going to be a warm day. find some water if you can. >> five snow boarders have died in what officials are calling colorado's deadliest avalanche in five decades. it happened yesterday afternoon near loveland pass about 50 miles west of denver. authorities say six snowboarders were on the almost 12,000 foot high pass when all of a sudden the snow gave way. >> they triggered a slide. at least one of them was able to bail off to the side and partially buried, but he was able to get himself out and call for help. >> authorities say the avalanche was about 600 feet wide and 8 feet deep. right now, authorities say the avalanche danger in colorado is at a 30 year high due to a lack of snow. >>> some people in the town of west, texas, are being allowed back into their homes for the first time since that deadly fertilizer explosion. a curfew is sti
we are in a law of war environment as professor somin said you can target an enemy while he's sleeping based on the status, not his activities. >> since we are talking about the method we use them are talking about low back, mr. mr. bergen and ms. al-muslimi testimony. this can argue ms. brooks or mr. berk
easily to $2 billion in savings. $4.5 billion and will be spent a day to operate in that environment. when in fact you cannot go on the street with the exception of the package delivery, which will be done with dynamic routing, with a lower-cost employee, whether in the rural craft or city craft and allow us to provide that service at a lower acroscost. that is all money that can come out of the system. if calculated in what we think is the revenue loss, and we have talked to customers to validate that. we are terms of that. that we clear something up. people say it is only $2 billion out of $20 billion. if we had it this year we would break even. this year we will lose $1.7 billion on the operating line. as revenue,-costs, with the exception of a worker's comp costs and pre funding. we would make money if we made the six to five move at the beginning of this year. what happens with a $20 billion of that gap exists when you do nothing over a five-year period, and with inflation that continues to grow. when people say it is only 10% of the cost differential, it is not, it would make u
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